Wednesday, July 23, 2014
Johnnie Phelps, a woman sergeant in the army, thought, “There was a tolerance for lesbianism if they needed you. The battalion I was in was probably about ninety-seven percent lesbian.”
Sergeant Phelps worked for General Eisenhower. Four decades after Eisenhower had defeated the Axis powers, Phelps recalled an extraordinary event. One day, the general told her, “I’m giving you an order to ferret those lesbians out. We’re going to get rid of them.”
“I looked at him and then I looked at his secretary who was standing next to me, and I said, ‘Well, sir, if the general pleases, sir, I’ll be happy to do this investigation for you. But you have to know that the first name on the list will be mine.’ “
“And he was kind of taken aback a bit. And then this women standing next to me said, ‘Sir, if the General pleases, you must be aware that Sergeant Phelp’s name may be second, but mine will be first.”
“Then I looked at him, and said, ‘Sir, you’re right. They’re lesbians in the WAC battalion. And if the general is prepared to replace all the file clerks, all the section commanders, all the drivers-every woman in the WAC detachment-and there were about nine hundred and eighty something of us-then I’ll be happy to make that list. But I think the general should be aware that among those women are the most highly decorated women in the war. There have been no cases of illegal pregnancy. There have been no cases of AWOL. There have been no cases of misconduct. And as a matter of fact, every six months since we’ve been here, the general has awarded us a commendation for meritorious conduct.”
“And he said, ‘Forget the order.’”

The Gay Metropolis, page 47, Charles Kaiser (via bibliothekara)

Phelps tells this story herself in the excellent 1984 documentary Before Stonewall, which you can watch in its entirety on YouTube (she’s at 19:30, but really, watch the whole thing): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kX7AxQd82H8

(via theodoradove)

litlpup:

melkior:

send hELP

MY MOUTH IS FULL OF FLABMINGRAWRLGRHLBPPLBS

estelofimladris:

lovetteorleaveit:

higherthantheking:

theycallm3bruce:

parentingequality:

PSA for Parenting Equality in Europe.

Gave me fucking chills

full body goosebumps.

freckledtrash:

Disney’s The Jungle Book cast so far: Neel Sethi as Mowgli, Ben Kingsley as the voice of Bagheera, Lupita Nyong’o as the voice of Rakcha, Scarlett Johansson as the voice of Kaa and Idris Elba as the voice of Shere Khan (x x x x)

YO, THIS IS A REAL THING THAT IS HAPPENING

And not only is the cast amazing, but the film is going to be a mixture of live-action and animation (a-la Mary Poppins). Neel Seth (Mowgli),is going to be the only live-action actor and everyone else’s characters will be animated AND I COULD NOT BE MORE EXCITED.

(Source: starberry-cupcake)

kaleidomusings:

felicefawn:

Coloring embryos by injecting dye into eggs before they hatch has been practiced for a number of years. It is done to identify the young of certain hatches or groups. And it makes it easier to observe movements of wild birds (especially water fowl) after they leave the nests.

The process of coloring chicks by injecting dye into the eggs also provides an opportunity to study early feather growth. Juvenile plumage will replace the colored down in about two weeks. As this happens, the dyed background amid new growing feathers provides a constantly changing pattern.

While it is possible to inject eggs from about the 10th to 19th days of incubation, the period from the 11th to 14th days appears to be ideal. Only one treatment is necessary if the injection is done at this time. When injections are made after the 14th day the color usually remains localized because the embryo occupies most of the egg; so it may be necessary to inject the egg in more than one place.

Harmless vegetable dyes, such as food coloring dyes sold in grocery stores, work very satisfactorily.

This does not harm the chicks in any way, and eventually as they mature their adult feathers push through and they develop normally with their standard coloured feathers.

The coloring is really interesting but just watch this video because it’s a bunch of chicks chasing a shiny piece of wrapper and it’s so freaking adorable.

Someone in my office is eating a lunch so garlic-laden that I can smell it from four cubes away. Guess we’ll all be safe from vampires today…

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

jtotheizzoe:

Doodling the Right Thing

With a few humble doodles, I think Google may have created the most widely-seen, and perhaps the most influential, science communication effort on Earth. Their series of Google search page tributes to female scientists (a few of which I’ve shared above) is a huge win for showcasing the efforts of women in science, which, unless you’ve been living under a very patriarchal rock for the past forever, you know is something the world needs very badly. 

It might seem silly to be talking about a picture like this, but we’re dealing with the Times Square billboard of internet graphics here. Every day, 730 million people visit Google.com a total of 17 billion times. Billion. Granted, not all of them see the same Google doodle, as only a small set of them are “global” doodles, but even if just 10% of daily unique visitors see a particular doodle, and just 10% of those people take the time to figure out who/what they’re looking at, that means 7+ million people a day (and that doesn’t even take into account repeated visits). I suspect that’s a low estimate, too, although I base that on nothing except my own optimism.

For comparison, Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey drew just over 3 million U.S. viewers for its final episode. I’ll concede that’s not really a fair comparison, since Cosmos is a highly-produced, hour-long scripted TV series with very broad and lofty goals and a Google doodle is, well, a picture on the internet. The point I’m trying to make is not that Cosmos is less influential than a cartoon, because that’s ridiculous (although I must admit the more I think about it, I really don’t know how ridiculous it is). My point is that a Google doodle about science reaches a metric f**kton of people.

I am having a hard time thinking of another single Internet Thing that has the potential to reach so many people in a single day. No meme-filled Facebook page or educational YouTube channel comes close, and I don’t suspect any traditional science news/media sites are even in the ballpark. 

Google still has a long way to go to bring their doodle gender representation anywhere close to level. According to SPARK, only 17% of doodles between 2001-2013 were women (and 74% of them were white people). I can’t find the numbers, but on the bright side it seems like 2014 has showcased a high percentage of women in the doodles. In addition to monitoring women featured in doodles, the blog Speaking Up For Us keeps a running list of doodle-worthy women.Despite that remaining imbalance, I think this is an incredible effort on the part of Google, and we should demand even more doodles of underrepresented groups (both in science and beyond).

Can something so passive make any difference? To be honest, I don’t know, but I suspect that it does. When people only see one type of person recognized for accomplishing the Great Scientific Things of history, they consciously and subconsciously assume that only that type of person actually accomplishes Great Scientific Things. That is how underrepresented people stay underrepresented, which is the opposite thing we want to happen.

Google doodles aren’t going to cure cancer or send a human to Mars, but they just might help inspire the person who does. Not bad for a drawing.

The Muppet Movie The Muppets parallels

(Source: clarabellecows)

top ten buffyverse ships (as voted by my followers)

#6: Buffy Summers and Faith Lehane

gyzym:

To: pizzadog@stark.com, brownrecluse@stark.com, thehammerismy@stark.com, capsicle@stark.com, deathsicle@stark.com, wingman@stark.com
Cc: james.rhodes@us.af.mil, giantgreenragemonster@stark.com
From: ppotts@stark.com
Subject: Clarification.

Hello all,

First and foremost, I would like to apologize for your email addresses. I have tried repeatedly to have them switched to your requested handles, but it is, after all, Tony’s system, and he keeps switching them back. (Except for yours, Mr. Barton. For some reason, he seems to have deemed this choice acceptable.) 

Secondly: it has come to my attention that each of you has, in one way or another, been accosted by Tony with demands that you move into the Tower as soon as humanly possible. As I know how Tony can be, I wanted to make sure to shoot you a little note clarifying our position. We — that is, Tony and I — of course welcome each of you to join us in calling the Tower home, but you are not, as Tony may have suggested, under any obligation to do so. If you decide not to move in, that is perfectly acceptable, and I assure you that there will be no follow through on any threats to that may have been made to: stalk you; release feral cats in and/or around your homes; infect your apartments with a variety of insects including but not limited to bedbugs; blame you personally for the downfall of human civilization when inevitably the great enemy comes and you’re not there due to your selfish decision to retain your own residence; use technological prowess to make your bed smell constantly of tuna fish; buy your buildings and demolish them. 

Though it may seem counterintuitive, this is, for better or worse, how Tony sees fit to make friends. He is not particularly good at it, as I am sure you have all come to realize. This is why I have copied Colonel Rhodes and Dr. Banner on this email — their first-hand experience in Tony’s peculiar brand of affection may help you through the upcoming period of transition, as I am unfortunately far too busy to shepherd you all any further. Please direct any further inquiries, phone calls, concerns, and angry shrieking rants to either Colonel Rhodes or Dr. Banner, both of whom have repeatedly expressed willingness to commiserate in frustration on the topic of Tony. 

I hope this has been helpful, and I look forward to seeing you all in the future. 

Best,
Pepper

-

Virginia Potts
Chief Executive Officer
Stark Industries
ppotts@stark.com